November 6th to November 13th, 2016

MUJI: 2017 NotebooksSo.

How to respond?

I could talk about my emotional reaction to Trump’s election on Tuesday. But as a white, cisgendered American citizen whose queer French-American otherness is not visible or obvious and lives in a blue state whose governor has basically said “come and claim them“, let’s be honest—a detailed breakdown of my devastation isn’t helpful to the marginalized communities who have long been at more risk than me and who are even moreso now.

My heartbreak isn’t useful to anyone. Only the actions I take are.

So.

How to respond?

Masha Gessen has rules on how to survive an autocracy. I find the call to stay outraged the most useful of all, especially as I settle back into my sustaining routines and, due to my own privilege, can hear the siren call of relaxing. Resist this impulse. This is not normal.

Find out who your representatives at every level of government are. Put their numbers in your phone, add their emails to your contact list, whatever you need to do. They are going to hear a lot from you going forward.

If you live in a state that went to Trump whose electors are not bound to the popular vote in the state, you can try contacting your electors to ask them to change their vote. (Personally, I think you’ll have much better luck asking them to vote for a different Republican option, but you do you, my friend.)

This is a Southern Poverty Law Center petition you can sign calling for the reversal of the President-elect’s appointment of Stephen Bannon as his chief strategist.

If you’re feeling overwhelmed by how to help, this Twitter thread by Joel Snape urges you to just pick one thing. There’s a lot to do but every little bit helps. A monthly donation to the ACLU, Planned Parenthood, or Amnesty International is a great place to start, as is donating to red state NPR affiliates. Jezebel has a list of organizations that can use your time and money in the foreseeable future to keep fighting the good fight.

Privileged folks: learn how to be a good ally. Jenny at Reading the End has a Storify teaching you how. tumblr user maeril’s guide to what to do if you witness Islamophobic harassment is more necessary than ever. The Southern Poverty Law Center has a fantastic, long guide to fighting everyday bigotry with scripts.

Emily Ellsworth on Twitter shares the most effective ways to communicate with your government representatives. In short: PICK UP THE PHONE!

Pop Vox looks like it’s a good way to keep track of pending legislation so you know when to contact your representatives.

If you’re concerned about your cybersecurity, The Mary Sue has a primer on Internet security.

Here are 10 mental health resources that you should keep in your back pocket going forward.

There’s plenty more to be done going forward and I’ll include what I can in each week’s missive. Stay safe and stay outraged.

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4 thoughts on “November 6th to November 13th, 2016”

  1. Hugs to you, friend. I’m feeling pretty overwhelmed and panicky, like we all, but I’ve found a few things to do, and that’s helping more than me fretting ceaselessly would/is. Every new thing Trump says or does seems to make it worse and worse — it’s obvious he has no idea how to govern, and I don’t see how the country gets through this without collapsing. That’s probably an ahistorical view to take, and I’m trying to educate myself more about past corruption in our country and other people’s, to help feel less scared and more, I dunno, aware of what I can do next? Where to focus my energies? So. We’ll see.

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  2. I’ve definitely been thinking about finding that “one thing” to start with as far as making change. Not that I wasn’t trying to help before, but now it feels even more urgent. I have to trust that other caring people will step up for the other areas that are important but that I can’t address much personally. And for those issues that I can’t address my energy toward personally, I can at least be a cheerleader for those fighting those causes, and amplify their voices.

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